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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 35  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 126

Characteristics of COVID-19 vaccine-associated hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy, a new problem in cancer screening by 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: A preliminary summary


1 Private Academic Consultant, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Department of Community Medicine, Dr. DY Patil University, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission06-Jul-2021
Date of Decision08-Aug-2021
Date of Acceptance09-Aug-2021
Date of Web Publication15-Jun-2022

Correspondence Address:
Rujittika Mungmunpuntipantip
Private Academic Consultant, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jms.jms_83_21

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How to cite this article:
Mungmunpuntipantip R, Wiwanitkit V. Characteristics of COVID-19 vaccine-associated hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy, a new problem in cancer screening by 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: A preliminary summary. J Med Soc 2021;35:126

How to cite this URL:
Mungmunpuntipantip R, Wiwanitkit V. Characteristics of COVID-19 vaccine-associated hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy, a new problem in cancer screening by 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography: A preliminary summary. J Med Soc [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 Jul 2];35:126. Available from: https://www.jmedsoc.org/text.asp?2021/35/3/126/347645



Sir,

Effect of COVID-19 vaccination on cancer screening is an important issue in clinical oncology. False-positive axillary lymph node, vaccine-associated hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy (VAHL) from 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography cancer screening, following administration of a COVID-19 vaccine is possible.[1],[2],[3] In addition, an equivocal undifferentiated result between malignancy and benign lesion might occur and lead to difficulty in cancer diagnosis.[4] It is suggested that cancer screening should be done before vaccination or many weeks after vaccination.[5]

Here, the authors retrospectively summarize on available data on characteristics of VAHL on 270 cases. All VAHL cases are ipsilateral to vaccine injection side. Lymph node enlargement and visible injection site are observed in 39 (14.44%) and 100 (37.03%) cases, respectively. Most cases (77.04%) have less than Grade II intensity of uptake (maximum standardized uptake value <4). Based on this analysis, it can show that VAHL from cancer screening might occur in a case with ipsilateral mild-to-moderate intense hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy regardless of lymph node enlargement or visible injection site. Further comparative study with a nonvaccinated group is recommended for finding a differential diagnosis cut-off.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Ahmed N, Muzaffar S, Binns C, Ilyas MW, Usmani S. COVID-19 vaccination manifesting as incidental lymph nodal uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Clin Nucl Med 2021;46:435-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Nawwar AA, Searle J, Hopkins R, Lyburn ID. False-positive axillary lymph nodes on FDG PET/CT resulting from COVID-19 immunization. Clin Nucl Med 2021;46:1004-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Avner M, Orevi M, Caplan N, Popovtzer A, Lotem M, Cohen JE. COVID-19 vaccine as a cause for unilateral lymphadenopathy detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT in a patient affected by melanoma. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2021;48:2659-60.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Cohen D, Krauthammer SH, Wolf I, Even-Sapir E. Hypermetabolic lymphadenopathy following administration of BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 vaccine: Incidence assessed by [(18)F]FDG PET-CT and relevance to study interpretation. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging 2021;48:1854-63.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Mahase E. Covid-19: Schedule breast screening before vaccine or 4 to 6 weeks after to avoid false positives, says guidance. BMJ 2021;372:n617.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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